Top Ten Countdown On How To Thrive In College

What to do you love to do? Perhaps there is a field of study that really sparks your interest, or maybe you’ve taken courses that you really loved. Think about your past work experiences. What did you like and dislike about those jobs? You should also consider the hobbies you enjoy. Were you involved in any extracurricular activities? Transfer those hobbies and interests into your major and career choice.

It’s a fact that you don’t always know when things are going to happen. You might think you do, but you don’t. Have protection. It doesn’t mean you need it in your pocket at all times, just where you can get to it if you need it. You don’t want to have to choose between having protection and having an STD in the heat of the moment, and it’s not something to fool around with.

Prepare yourself with questions about your old job. Whether you were laid off or left on your own free will, have answers prepared for interviewers as to why you left your previous place of work. If you got laid off, don’t lie.

Even after four years of schooling it would be expected that a graduate would have the necessary skills to conduct themselves in the job market. But even with all the time and money invested students are finding the need to enter graduate school. The Rutgers work trends division found that “62% believe they will need more formal education if they are to be successful in their chosen careers” (Godofsky, Zukin, Van Horn 18). This may further their entrance into the job market and increase the debt total that has accumulated. But on the other hand they can gain valuable work experience considering many graduate students become teacher assistants or lab techs with the professors in their area of study.

Network with your neighbors. Seventy to eighty percent of jobs are found through networking, so get out there and talk to the people you know. Tell everyone you’re related to, everyone you see each day and everyone you meet (association members, friends of friends, airplane seatmates) that you are looking for a job and you’d love any advice or ideas they can provide. Most people are happy to offer some suggestions-or, even better, a hot lead.

Get carded. Writing your phone number on a cocktail napkin or ATM receipt is cute at a party, but it sends the wrong message when you’re networking professionally. Show that you are prepared to meet people by having business cards at the ready. All you need on the card is your name, a phone number (which can be a cell phone), and an email address. I am thoroughly impressed when I meet a student who has cards. It shows maturity, foresight, and an eagerness to have the appropriate tools for the working world.

He took some Pepto-Bismol. He had diarrhea and an upset stomach. He went to bed and when he woke in the morning he said he was feeling a little better. I asked him if he was going to be well enough to go. He said he was going and that he felt better. His dad took him to the career center to meet the bus. We were not to go just two teachers and six students.

If it is your first time away from home, don’t fear calling your parents. Though you may feel embarrassed, they love you. If something is scary or overwhelming, they are still your greatest allies. Otherwise, consider an older sibling or close friend. Sometimes, life can seem overwhelming. Older people really do understand.