How To Navigate A Career Fair

After you sign up for a checking account, make sure that you do not leave without getting the free checks that most establishments offer. Do not pay for extras. You may be surprised at how few checks you will use over the course of your four years in college. It is simple enough to get more if you need them, but you don’t want to waste money if at all possible.

Think about the type of program that you are interested in studying. Whether you are looking for a structured or flexible curriculum, a practical or theoretical emphasis on study, or how much of an emphasis you would like based on research can help you to narrow down your choices.

Do informational interviewing as a reality check for the above. Find out from your contacts in the career field you’re interested in if your skill set is up-to-date.

Network with your neighbors. Seventy to eighty percent of jobs are found through networking, so get out there and talk to the people you know. Tell everyone you’re related to, everyone you see each day and everyone you meet (association members, friends of friends, airplane seatmates) that you are looking for a job and you’d love any advice or ideas they can provide. Most people are happy to offer some suggestions-or, even better, a hot lead.

How does that work exactly? Remember — a resume isn’t your permanent record; it’s a marketing brochure about you. Do you every wonder why your new car dealer has so many brochures about each and every feature of their cars? It’s because customers are too busy to read very much, and they certainly won’t read a big bookish kind of brochure about a car. They want to pick and choose the information they want, and toss everything else.

When you approach a job whether it is full or part time, approach it as a professional job. You might not think that working at a fast food restaurant would call for a professional attitude but if you’re major is business it does.

As you near the end of college, you’ll start to realize you’re not going to be there forever. If you are smart, you’ll already have started deciding what you want to do next, such as attending graduate school, getting a professional job, or starting a business. There’s no way of knowing where you’ll end up for sure, but it will help a lot if you start making contacts both within the college and in the fields you want to pursue. Ask your professors, your career center counselors, alumni, whoever you can. You are so much more likely to get where you need to go if you know the right people.

TIP: When Mom and dad could not afford the barber we sought out a beauty school or barber college. Students worked on our hair under the watchful eye of licensed stylists. Depending on your income, a shampoo, cut and style can be free or just a nominal charge.