Post-graduation Job Search Tips

Get some advice from the people who are working in the fields that interest you. You could look online for interviews or interview some of these people yourself. Can you relate to these individuals or see yourself in a similar work situation?

Get carded. Writing your phone number on a cocktail napkin or ATM receipt is cute at a party, but it sends the wrong message when you’re networking professionally. Show that you are prepared to meet people by having business cards at the ready. All you need on the card is your name, a phone number (which can be a cell phone), and an email address. I am thoroughly impressed when I meet a student who has cards. It shows maturity, foresight, and an eagerness to have the appropriate tools for the working world.

The same idea as why to have fun applies here: You don’t yet have the responsibilities of an adult. You should treat this timeframe as an opportunity to get ahead whenever you can. No one’s judging you for your particular financial situation, and the details about everyone else’s personal finances are largely hidden, because a lot of people are either there on their parents’ money or the federal government’s. Just because some people spend a lot, doesn’t mean you should. If you get a head start now when you don’t have as many expenses (such as a house, a car, a lawn, or most costly of all, babies), you’ll be glad you did.

Edward Brewer sued Providence Hospital for failing to prevent him from raping a patient there. Yes, that’s right. He committed a crime and blamed the hospital for not stopping him.

If it is your first time away from home, don’t fear calling your parents. Though you may feel embarrassed, they love you. If something is scary or overwhelming, they are still your greatest allies. Otherwise, consider an older sibling or close friend. Sometimes, life can seem overwhelming. Older people really do understand.

Choose a quiet place to do your job search with a computer, phone and personal calendar. This could be at home, the library or your local career center.

Visit A local Job Fair – Companies, which take part of job fairs, also post their needs for interns. If you do not find any post for such, ask the representatives of these companies for any opportunity. Be quick to enlist yourself for an interview.

You can make any job turn into something big. You may start out in the mail room, but who said you had to stay there. Getting your foot in the door with a company is a wonderful start. Once you’re in a company you want to work for, you can apply internally and prove your abilities for promotion.

Improve Your Job Searching Attitude

The companies firmly entrenched in the space don’t exactly roll out a doormat for new competitors. When you begin to show some of the executives in the industry that you are a threat to their ability to still afford that condo in Miami while paying for the twins’ college, it tends to anger them.

6) Computers – Today, a computer is a must for any job search. It is on the computers where you find many jobs, where you do most of your research and where you will apply on line. If you can afford your own, that is best but there are free computers at the library and at your local career center.

Usually this is because you aren’t clear enough about your message to boil it down to one page. When you’re clear on your core message, it will easily fit. Remember a resume’s intent is to get an interview. You want employers to think you are interesting enough to bring in for a conversation. It does not need to tell your whole life story.

Do informational interviewing as a reality check for the above. Find out from your contacts in the career field you’re interested in if your skill set is up-to-date.

4) Travel Expenses -With gas prices today, even an interview nearby home costs some money, and depending on your range of your career campaign, the cost of travel may increase. Don’t discount spending your own money for travel to get the right position.

The Joblink Center is a great resource for resume help as well as computers for job search use, help with job searches and access to training. Best of all, most of the services offered at the Joblink are free. Also, ask the HR person at your previous job for resume tips and what they look for in a resume. You may also have friends that you could ask to review your resume to get an outsiders perspective.

Student jobs in your major are as easy to find as those that do something different. The first place to check is in your campus human resource department. Often they have a variety of jobs on campus that relate to a lot of different topics.

Don’t ever forget that you usually get out of something what you put in (that annoying “you reap what you sow” adage that your grandfather might have told you, while he was sitting with straw in his teeth and a spittoon next to the rocking chair). If you go to events on campus, keep meeting new people, attend lectures that aren’t even required (gasp!), and maybe even do some community service, you’ll find the whole experience much more rewarding. You’ll feel like a part of the community, instead of just a student.